Providing Columbia Mo with a quality dietary supplement

Providing Columbia Missouri with a quality dietary supplement. Nano sized silver ions make Beinki's own Colloidal Silver and Ionic Silver the best locally made mineral supplement. I have also become a Youngevity Distributor. I will answer your questions the best I can beinkisown@hotmail.com

Thursday, December 1, 2016

MU mumps outbreak expands to 128 confirmed and probable cases

COLUMBIA — An outbreak of mumps at the University of Missouri has expanded to 128 confirmed and probable cases, according to the MU Student Health Center and local health departments.
In the beginning of November, the Health Center reported that a handful of students had been diagnosed with mumps. This number has been expanding quickly ever since.
Susan Even, executive director of the Health Center, explained that because the virus is transmitted through saliva, students spread the mumps by sharing drinking cups or eating from the same plate.
"We've never had an outbreak like this," Even said. "There has been sporadic isolated cases of mumps over the years, but nothing like this."
All infected students met the immunization policy requirement of two Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR) vaccines. A majority of cases have occurred in students with links to Greek organizations on campus, according to the Health Center. READ MORE

Sunday, November 13, 2016

Florida Zika Virus Cases Edge Past 1,150

TALLAHASSEE, FL — Summer might be over, but that doesn’t mean Florida’s mosquitoes have stopped biting. Case in point, the total number of Zika virus reports across the state rose to 1,1,58 on Friday.
The Nov. 11 announcement included seven new travel-related cases. Four of the cases involve Broward County residents, two were from Miami-Dade and one from Palm Beach County. Two new locally acquired cases were also confirmed by the Florida Department of Health. Both cases are connected to the ongoing Miami Beach investigation.
The breakdown of cases as of Nov. 11 statewide is as follows:  READ MORE

Sunday, October 23, 2016

Pre-treatment of bandages may improve antibacterial properties of nanoparticles

Pre-treating the fabric surface of the bandages used to treat burns with enzymes and polyethylene glycol or cellulase may promote the adhesion of antibacterial nanoparticles and improve their bacteria-repelling ability. Injuries caused by burns are a global health problem, with the World Health Organisation citing 195,000 deaths per year worldwide as a result of burns from fires alone. Burn injuries are particularly susceptible to infections, hospital-acquired or otherwise, with the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa accounting for over half of all severe burn infections. READ MORE

Monday, September 19, 2016

Missouri VA hospital may have infected 1,800 veterans with HIV

(CNN) -- A Missouri VA hospital is under fire because it may have exposed more than 1,800 veterans to life-threatening diseases such as hepatitis and HIV.
John Cochran VA Medical Center in St. Louis has recently mailed letters to 1,812 veterans telling them they could contract hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) after visiting the medical center for dental work, said Rep. Russ Carnahan.
Carnahan said Tuesday he is calling for a investigation into the issue and has sent a letter to President Obama about it.
"This is absolutely unacceptable," said Carnahan, a Democrat from Missouri. "No veteran who has served and risked their life for this great nation should have to worry about their personal safety when receiving much needed healthcare services from a Veterans Administration hospital." READ MORE

Saturday, September 17, 2016

CDC says flu mist vaccination is ineffective

COLUMBIA, Mo. -
The CDC is recommending people to not get the flu mist vaccination this flu season. It says that form of the vaccine is not very effective this year.
Doctors do recommend getting the flu vaccination in the form of a shot.
A representative from the Columbia/Boone County Health Department says flu season in mid-Missouri usually starts in October and lasts until late spring.
The Columbia Boone County Health Department is offering free flu vaccination shots to children 6 months to 18 years-old. Boone County schools will also be offering free vaccines to students.
"I SAY DON"T GET ANY FLU VACCINATION" beinki

Monday, September 12, 2016

Total number of Zika infections in Singapore rises to 329


SINGAPORE, Sept. 11 (Xinhua) -- Singapore confirmed 11 new cases of locally transmitted Zika virus infection on Sunday, bringing the total number of Zika infections in the city state to 329, the Ministry of Health (MOH) and National Environment Agency (NEA) said in a joint statement.
MOH said among these newly reported cases, one case is linked to the Elite Terrace cluster. The other 10 cases have no known links to any existing cluster.
MOH confirmed that eight pregnant women have been confirmed to have Zika. Their doctors are following up closely with them to provide support and counselling.
NEA is continuing with vector control operations and outreach efforts in the cluster areas. As of Sept. 10, a total of 202 breeding habitats have been found and destroyed in the cluster areas, of which 121 are from homes, and 81 from common areas/other premises. READ MORE

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

STI WARNING: Sexually transmitted infections becoming RESISTANT to antibiotics

GONORRHOEA, syphilis and chlamydia are becoming immune to antibiotics, the World Health Organization (WHO) has warned.

The super-strain STDs have developed because antibiotics are often used incorrectly or too frequently and lose their effectiveness.
The worldwide spread STDs gonorrhoea, syphilis and chlamydia is intensifying, according to UN figures.
A WHO spokesman said: ”Antibiotic resistance of these sexually transmitted diseases has increased rapidly, which has shrunk the possibilities of treatment.”
The strongest resistance was developed by the gonorrhoea pathogens, with which 78million people each year worldwide are infected.
He added: "Gonorrhoea strains have been discovered that don't respond to any of the available antibiotics anymore.”  READ MORE

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Pool Safety: 4 Dangers Of Swimming, From Infections To Asthma

Earlier this August, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report detailing the many ways that contact lenses can cause eye infections.
One contributing factor is simply leaving them in while swimming. Out of the 1,000 or so reports of contact lens-related infections the CDC looked at from 2005 to 2015, 0.9 percent happened from someone wearing lenses while swimming. It’s estimated that eye infections lead to 1 million clinic and emergency department visits annually, with improper contact lens use being a big slice of that pie.
Of course, the possibility of swimming pool infections isn’t something that only people who wear contact lenses have to worry about. READ MORE

Friday, July 29, 2016

Mosquitoes have apparently begun spreading Zika in U.S.

MIAMI (AP) -- Mosquitoes have apparently begun spreading the Zika virus on the U.S. mainland for the first time, Florida officials said Friday in a long-feared turn in the epidemic that is sweeping Latin America and the Caribbean.
Four recently infected people in the Miami area - one woman and three men - are believed to have caught the virus locally through mosquito bites, Gov. Rick Scott said at a news conference.
No mosquitoes in Florida have actually been found to be carrying Zika, despite the testing of 19,000 by the state lab. READ MORE

Saturday, July 23, 2016

What Is a Bladder Infection?

A bladder infection is a bacterial infection within the bladder. Some people call a bladder infection a urinary tract infection (UTI). This refers to a bacterial infection anywhere in the urinary tract, such as the bladder, kidneys, ureters, or the urethra. While most cases of bladder infection occur suddenly (acute), others may recur over the long term (chronic). Early treatment is key to preventing the spread of the infection.  READ MORE

Saturday, July 9, 2016

Cheap blood test can discriminate between bacterial, viral infections

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have made an important breakthrough in their ongoing efforts to develop a diagnostic test that can tell health-care providers whether a patient has a bacterial infection and will benefit from antibiotics.
The study was published July 6 in Science Translational Medicine.
Antibiotics have saved millions of lives and created a world in which complex and lifesaving surgeries are possible. But the overuse of antibiotics threatens to create a global scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. Because of this problem, public health experts regularly remind physicians to prescribe antibiotics only for bacterial infections. But too often there’s no easy way for doctors to tell whether a patient’s illness is bacterial or viral or, sometimes, if there’s any infection at all.   READ MORE

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Bacterial infections prompt 2 York Hospital lawsuits

Two lawsuits have been filed against York Hospital and the manufacturer of a medical device that was linked to a series of bacterial infections throughout southcentral Pennsylvania, and one alleges their negligence led to a man’s death.
The complaints were filed last week in the York County Court of Common Pleas, and also name WellSpan Health as a defendant. The lawsuits come about eight months after York Hospital said it was notifying approximately 1,300 patients who had open-heart surgery between Oct. 1, 2011, and July 24, 2015, that they could have been exposed to nontuberculous mycobacteria. READ MORE

Friday, June 17, 2016

C.D.C. Reports 234 Pregnant Women in U.S. With Zika

WASHINGTON — The number of women infected with the Zika virus during their pregnancies in the continental United States has risen to 234, health officials said on Thursday.
Officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention declined to say how many of the women had given birth, citing confidentiality concerns for the women and their families. But they did cite six cases with abnormalities — three babies with birth defects and another three who died before birth with evidence of defects.  READ MORE

Saturday, June 11, 2016

type 2 diabetes blood sugar levels now normal

I just had to pass on my latest diabetes testimonial. Beinki


Type 2 diabetes reversed!
I have another fantastic testimonial to pass on. I just got a call from Paul and Kip More from Canada saying Kip(his wife) no longer is on diabetes medication and after a few months on Youngevitys Blood sugar pak her A1C numbers are normal! Her leg neuropathy is also resolved. the only issue still remaining is her wet macular degeneration(we are still working on that).

Both Paul and I give special thanks to Dr. Wallach and Youngevity. I now have not only  devout distributors but life long friends. Paul would like anyone to hear his message to call him832-328-6424 and ask questions about their healing journey.

For those of you in Youngevity you know what Doc’s supplements can do, for those of you who are not involved yet and would like to learn more check out my Youngevity site here  http://1beinki.youngevity.com/  or call me directly 573-214-0195

Sincerely,
Mike McMillen
Youngevity
Senior Executive Marketing Director

Sunday, June 5, 2016

Multiple Salmonella Outbreaks Lead to Hundreds Infected in 35 States

Salmonella outbreaks involving seven different strains of the bacteria have been identified by CDC officials since January, confirmed via lab testing. Of those sickened, 66 have been hospitalized. One death has been reported, but the CDC clarified that salmonella infection was not considered to be a contributing factor in that case.
Symptoms of salmonella infection can include nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, fever and chills.
In multiple cases the outbreaks were linked back to people interacting with live poultry, including ducklings and chicks from various hatcheries, according to the CDC. Those buying the baby birds told the CDC they bought the animals for a variety of reasons including to get fresh eggs, learn about agriculture, keep as pets or give away for Easter.READ MORE

Sunday, May 15, 2016

Side Effects Of Common Antibiotics Outweigh Benefits In Some Infections

The battle against rising antibiotic overuse and dependence continues. This time, a safety announcement focused on the potential side effects that render some benefits insignificant.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said the side effects of common antibiotics outweigh the benefits in some infections.
The FDA announcement focused on fluoroquinolone antibacterial drugs, including the common, powerful antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which is used to treat people with uncomplicated urinary tract or sinus infections or bronchitis.
Ciprofloxacin (marketed as Cipro) is manufactured by Bayer AG and has been on the market for more than two decades. Another fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug is levofloxacin (marketed as Levaquin), manufactured by Johnson & Johnson. Levaquin is often prescribed to patients with urinary tract infections and prostatitis, which is an infection of the prostate. READ MORE
why not take colloidal silver for UTI's-no side effects at all-beinki

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Hospital Errors are the Third Leading Cause of Death in U.S.

New research estimates up to 440,000 Americans are dying annually from preventable hospital errors. This puts medical errors as the third leading cause of death in the United States, underscoring the need for patients to protect themselves and their families from harm, and for hospitals to make patient safety a priority.
Released today, the Fall 2013 update to The Leapfrog Group (Leapfrog) Hospital Safety Score assigns A, B, C, D and F grades to more than 2,500 U.S. general hospitals. It shows many hospitals are making headway in addressing errors, accidents, injuries and infections that kill or hurt patients, but overall progress is slow. The Hospital Safety Score is calculated under the guidance of the Leapfrog Blue Ribbon Expert Panel, with a fully transparent methodology analyzed in the peer-reviewed Journal of Patient Safety. READ MORE

Thursday, April 28, 2016

The FDA Warns That A Common Yeast Infection Drug Can Increase The Risk Of Miscarriage

Yeast infections, which are a common annoyance for many women, are especially common during pregnancy. And new research finds that one of the standard treatments could be dangerous for developing babies. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just issued a safety alert for pregnant women about taking the oral prescription drug Diflucan (also known as fluconazole). The FDA cites results from a new Danish study that found there is an increased risk of miscarriage for pregnant women who take Diflucan.
“Patients who are pregnant or actively trying to get pregnant should talk to their health care professionals about alternative treatment options for yeast infections,” the alert states.
Unfortunately, pregnant women are at an increased risk of developing yeast infections, with an estimated 10 percent of women developing them at some point during their pregnancy.
“Yeast infections are more common during pregnancy,” women’s health expert Jennifer Wider, M.D., tells SELF. “The hormonal changes that occur in the body while a woman is pregnant make her more vulnerable to yeast overgrowth because the pH balance in the vagina is affected.” READ MORE